Tuesday, September 22, 2009

AUTUMNAL EQUINOX (Mabon)

The balance point between day and night is hard to imagine where I am today, it's so overcast, muggy and sullen. Some trees are beginning to shed from lack of rain rather than from chilly nights and brisk mornings. I found this lovely, short video on YouTube to help with the anticipation of the flaming colors I hope are yet to come.




Video from YT memeber MereRana

8 comments:

Lin Floyd said...

lovely video, don't give up the sun will shine again...

Sylvia K said...

That is a lovely video and your sun will return. And wouldn't you know it??? It's supposed to be 90 here in the Ballard area of Seattle!! We're always cooler than in Seattle proper because of being so close to the Sound. Crazy! But it is beautiful! I'm sending you some of our blue skies and sun!

Enjoy anyway, Deborah!

Sylvia

bobbie said...

The video is lovely. You always come up with wonderful ones. I miss bonfires.

Quiet Paths said...

Really beautiful. I don't doubt you will get some color soon. The equinox is due to occur here in less than 2 hours (5;18 ET). happy Fall in two hours!

fourwindsphotojournal said...

It is warm and stuffy here, too. Hard to take after the lovely week, just done.

It won't last, though, that is for sure. Did you get all of your outdoor work done?

Betsy from Tennessee said...

Yeah Rah Deb... We finally saw the SUN today... First time in over a week... It felt so good. I just stood outside and felt that warm sunshine on my shoulders. Hopefully all of our rains are over down here. At least we didn't get the flooding like some areas did.

Neat video.
Hugs,
Betsy

Quackster said...

Coming for Cali, the autumn equinox signals fire season unfortunately. Dry winds, low humidity and dusty weather. It doesn't help when the suns on full blast. However, I'd still love living here despite that.

Sue said...

lovely! Wow, I'm surprised you don't have any color yet. Eastern Kentucky has began showing little bits of color as early as the first week in September. I'm convinced that environmental stressors other than just temperature can trigger fall colors in some vulnerable trees.