Sunday, November 1, 2009

TRANSITIONS


October on Lake Erie’s north shore brings alternating stretches of bright days and dull days. Through it all, the creatures in the area gather together; each for their own reasons. Last week, huge murders of crows filled the skies over my house. I’ll miss them and their loud raucus calls that rang all summer long over the fields.

Another congregation we saw was the annual arrival of clusters (official term for ladybugs) of Asian ladybugs. They came in their largest number a while ago, covering the breakwall parapet and the rocks in the garden. I missed getting a photo of them but even at their most abundant, we didn’t get them like they can in some parts of the continent, like in this video of a town in Colorado. It has to be seen to be believed!


I tried to find information on why the beetles do this. Consensus is that they’re looking for a place to ball up to hibernate for winter. Some people said suggested it was perhaps a ginormous autumnal love-in. I tend to think it’s the former, but I suppose romance can’t be entirely ruled out. Does anyone know?



Then there are the critters that don’t truly migrate, like this noisy solitary gull, perched on the groyne rocks at tiny Mersea Beach. He’ll stick around until the lake freezes up, forcing him and his brethren to move on to find open water. So everyone has a plan.





Even the fallen leaves are restless, crossing the road near my house as if they, too had purpose on the other side. All must hurry (including me) to finish up their autumn business as the days advance, the clocks retreat.

And now it is November.

13 comments:

Lin Floyd said...

we're lucky, we can just turn up the thermostat and add some layers of clothing and stay put...

Poetikat said...

I'm itching all over now! That video freaked me out! I hope they move on and don't head north!

magiceye said...

loved the composition of the gull pic

bobbie said...

Gee! I found one solitary ladybug in my kitchen yesterday.

Had to laugh at your leaves. I had just looked out of my front door to see masses of them sweeping ahead of the wind all down our street. I wish they would all continue to the end of the street, so I didn't have to deal with them later.

Betsy from Tennessee said...

Well Welcome to NOVEMBER, Deb.... Our falling leaves tell us that winter is on the way!!!!!!

We have had some swarms of Lady Bugs at our house--but mostly in the early spring. I despise those things --when they get into our house. Have you ever killed one??? They STINK bigtime.

We have those noisy crows year round down here--but they don't bother the feeders.

Have a great Nov. 1st.
Hugs,
Betsy

SandyCarlson said...

These transitions sure are an adventure. Murders and clusters can have a big impact.

I am always pleased when the lady bugs come inside, though they can be a challenge.

Indrani said...

So many Ladybugs!
A visual treat, at least in pics, though in real I am not sure how I will feel so many of them together.

Quiet Paths said...

I had never heard of a lady bug cluster; we don't get many here and they are like royal guests in our garden. Great post. The great dance of the leaves goes on here too.

YourFireAnt said...

My scientist friend here says it's like Woodstock for ladybugs.

So yeah....love-in.

;-)

Gel said...

I've heard of a murder of crows, but I never knew ladybugs came in such large "clusters." My daughter was a ladybug for Halloween...
Interesting post.

Ramblings of a Villas Girl said...

The video was amazing. I would love to see this myself.
Lisa of mountainphotog.blogspot.com lives in Colorado and has pictures and video of ladybugs. Pretty cool. Should check it out. Lisa

Kathiesbirds said...

That's quite a story! I have seen ladybugs swarm before but never THAT many! Wow!

Rose said...

Wonderful post!